SyenTiffik Lahz

Scientific Laws In FohnehTik EengGLish Voeess Sownd Chahrz


Scientific Law In FohnehTik EengGLish Voeess Sownd Chahrz


Wrd SyehnTiffik { GoT Maeed Less ShohrT Az And InkLuuded } Thuh Paeej Naeemd SyenTiffik.

Wrd Speld Az "Scientific" In FohnehTik EengGLish Voeess Sownd Chahrz

Thuh Wrd Truhdishuhnullee SpehLd Az " ScienTific "

Thuh Wrd Speld " ScienTific " Hrd Spohk At https://www.howtopronounce.com/scientific/

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Thuh NexT ETimmoLLuhjee Uv Wrd SyenTiffik Wuhz Fruhm:

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French scientifique, from Medieval Latin scientificus (“pertaining to science”).

Thuh NexT ETimmoLLuhjee Uv Wrd SyenTiffik Fruhm:

scientific (adj.)

1580s, from Middle French scientifique,

from Medieval Latin scientificus "pertaining to science,"

from Latin scientia "knowledge" (see science) + -ficus "making, doing,"…

Originally used to translate Greek epistemonikos "making knowledge" in Aristotle's "Ethics."…

First record of scientific revolution is from 1803;

scientific method is from 1854;

scientific notation is from 1961.

Related: Scientifical; scientifically.


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Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)1: Simp Lang Law
In Yeeng Voiss Sownd Chahrz Iz Lah Uv Lah Saiz Ohmz
Uv Thuh AhL Spundj STeiT Saiz Ohmz Uv Thuh AhL STeiT Saiz Ohmz Peidj LisT.

Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)2:0: Law Definition:

Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)2:1: Rules of conduct approved and enforced by the government of and over a certain territory…

Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)2:2: Related Terms: Regulation, Statutes, Lex Scripta, Act, Custom,… Civil Law,… Justice, Rule of Law, Substantive Law, Positive Law

Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)3:0: See Also=AhLsoh:
Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)3:1: * Civil Law
Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)3:2: * Lah Saiz Ohmz
Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)3:3: * Li
Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)3:4: * Nachuhrul Lah
Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)5:5: * Rule of Law
Lah Vrs (Haoh=#)5:6: * Saiunss Lahz


THuh NexT TekST Wuhz Fruhm:

Scientific Laws

Definition of a Scientific Law

A scientific law is a statement that describes an observable occurrence in nature that appears to always be true. It is a term used in all of the natural sciences (astronomy, biology, chemistry and physics, to name a few). But what is an observable occurrence? Well, it's something that can be seen by anyone and happens with no intervention by man.

In science, sometimes a law is called a 'principle'. The law or principle may describe only the occurrence, or it may describe the occurrence and predict it as well. However, a law does not make explanations about the natural occurrence.

Background of Scientific Laws

Some terms related to scientific law are 'hypothesis' and 'theory'. However, a scientific law is different from a hypothesis or a theory. The main difference is that a scientific law has been tested more than the other two - it's called being empirically tested. But another important difference is that a hypothesis is an explanation of an observation found in nature, while a law is based on observation only. In other words, the hypothesis is the why, while the law is the what.

The scientific method's process begins with the formulation of a hypothesis - which is an educated guess based on observations. Then the hypothesis is tested through research. After repeated testing and verification, the hypothesis may be moved up to a theory.

It's important to remember that a hypothesis and a theory cannot be proven, but they can be supported or rejected. So, can a scientific law be proven? Well, let's do a little more explanation before we get into that question.

Characteristics of Scientific Laws

Basically, scientific laws come from physics. Most laws can be represented as an equation (which is a mathematical formula). The formula can be used to predict an outcome. Specifically, once applied, the formula predicts that a new observation will conform to the law.

Now let's be clear: a scientific law does not have absolute certainty - nothing in science does. It could be overturned by future observations. For instance, Newton's Law of Gravitational Force was later found to only apply in weak gravitational fields. But does that mean that Newton's law is not important? Not at all! So, have we answered our question from above - can a law be proven? Yes, but it's always open to change.

See ALso=AhLSoh:
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_law


Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)1: Suffix s in Funetik Inglish iz -s , -es ohr suffix-z uv Syzohmz uv Omneeonizm.

Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)2:0: Pronunciation
Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)2:1: * IPA(key): /s/ (following a voiceless consonant)
Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)2:2: * IPA(key): /z/ (postvocalic or following a voiced consonant)
Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)2:3: * IPA(key): /ɨz/ (following a sibilant consonant /s, z, ʃ, ʒ, tʃ, dʒ/—usually written -es)

Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)3: Etymology
From Middle English -s, -es, from Old English -as, nominative-accusative plural ending of masculine a-stem (i.e. strong) declension nouns, from Proto-Germanic *-ōs, *‑ōz, from Proto-Indo-European *-es, *-oes (plural endings). The spread of this ending in later Middle English was once argued to have been the result of Anglo-Norman influence; however, -as was already the most common Old English plural marker (used in approximately 40% of Old English nouns), and was initially more common in the North of England where French influence was weakest, only later gradually spreading south. Cognate with Scots -s (plural ending), Saterland Frisian -s (plural ending), West Frisian -s (plural ending), Dutch -s (plural ending), Low German -s (plural ending), Danish -er (plural ending), Swedish -r, -ar, -or (plural ending), Icelandic -ar (plural ending), Gothic -𐍉𐍃 (-ōs, nominative plural ending of a-stem masculine nouns) (note that German -er has a different origin).

See ALso=AhLSoh:
* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific_law