Sovereign States

Sovereign States in Funetik Inglish

Sovereign in Funetik Inglish iz Sovrin uv Sovereign States

Pronunciation
(UK) IPA(key): /ˈsɒv.ɹɪn/

Etymology
From Old French soverain (whence also modern French souverain), from Vulgar Latin *superānus (compare Italian sovrano, Spanish soberano) from Latin super (“above”). Spelling influenced by folk-etymology association with reign. See also suzerain, foreign.

Sovereign Definition:

Has two meanings. The first one is a technical word for the monarch (king or queen) of a particular country as in the Sovereign of England is Queen Elizabeth. The other meaning of the word is to describe the supreme legislative powers of a state: that they are totally independent and free from any outside political control or authority over their decisions.

Related Terms: Sovereignty, Crown, State

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See: Wy PrakTiss UhgehnsT SmahL T

STaeeT Iz FohnehTik EengLish Fohr STaTe

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /steɪt/

Etymology Uv Wrd STaTe

state (n.1):

c. 1200, "circumstances, position in society, temporary attributes of a person or thing, conditions," from Old French estat "position, condition; status, stature, station," and directly from Latin status "a station, position, place; way of standing, posture; order, arrangement, condition," figuratively "standing, rank; public order, community organization," noun of action from past participle stem of stare "to stand" from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Some Middle English senses are via Old French estat (French état; see estate).

The Latin word was adopted into other modern Germanic Languages (German, Dutch staat) but chiefly in the political senses only. Meaning "physical condition as regards form or structure" is attested from late 13c. Meaning "mental or emotional condition" is attested from 1530s (phrase state of mind first attested 1749); colloquial sense of "agitated or perturbed state" is from 1837.

state (n.2)

"political organization of a country, supreme civil power, government," c. 1300, from special use of state (n.1); this sense grew out of the meaning "condition of a country" with regard to government, prosperity, etc. (late 13c.), from Latin phrases such as status rei publicæ "condition (or existence) of the republic."

The sense of "a semi-independent political entity under a federal authority, one of the bodies politic which together make up a federal republic" is from 1774. The British North American colonies occasionally were called states as far back as 1630s; the States has been short for "the United States of America" since 1777; also of the Netherlands…

state (v.)

1590s, "to set in a position," from state (n.1); the sense of "declare in words" is first attested 1640s, from the notion of "placing" something on the record. Related: Stated; stating.


State Definition:

Groups of people which have acquired international recognition as an independent country and which have a population, a common language and a defined and distinct territory.

Related Terms: Government, International Law, Law of Nations, Nation, Citizenship…

A term of international law; an independent country with standing in international law such as by membership in the United Nations, recognition by other states and adherence to international treaties.


Legal Definition of State

As a noun, a people permanently occupying a fixed territory bound together by common habits and custom into one body politic exercising, through the medium of an organized government, independent sovereignty and control over all persons and things within its boundaries, capable of making war and peace and of entering into international relations with other states… The people of a state, in their collective capacity, considered as the party wronged by a criminal deed…

The circumstances or condition of a being or thing at a given time.

As a verb, to express the particulars of a thing in writing or in words; to set down or set forth in detail; to aver, allege, or declare. To set down in gross; to mention in general terms, or by way of reference; to refer.


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Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)1: Suffix s in Funetik Inglish iz -s , -es ohr suffix-z uv Syzohmz uv Omneeonizm.

Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)2:0: Pronunciation
Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)2:1: * IPA(key): /s/ (following a voiceless consonant)
Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)2:2: * IPA(key): /z/ (postvocalic or following a voiced consonant)
Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)2:3: * IPA(key): /ɨz/ (following a sibilant consonant /s, z, ʃ, ʒ, tʃ, dʒ/—usually written -es)

Suffix s Vrs (Haoh=#)3: Etymology
From Middle English -s, -es, from Old English -as, nominative-accusative plural ending of masculine a-stem (i.e. strong) declension nouns, from Proto-Germanic *-ōs, *‑ōz, from Proto-Indo-European *-es, *-oes (plural endings). The spread of this ending in later Middle English was once argued to have been the result of Anglo-Norman influence; however, -as was already the most common Old English plural marker (used in approximately 40% of Old English nouns), and was initially more common in the North of England where French influence was weakest, only later gradually spreading south. Cognate with Scots -s (plural ending), Saterland Frisian -s (plural ending), West Frisian -s (plural ending), Dutch -s (plural ending), Low German -s (plural ending), Danish -er (plural ending), Swedish -r, -ar, -or (plural ending), Icelandic -ar (plural ending), Gothic -𐍉𐍃 (-ōs, nominative plural ending of a-stem masculine nouns) (note that German -er has a different origin).

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