Simp Lang RighTs in Funetik Inglish iz RyTs.

Simp Lang Right in Funetik Inglish iz Ryt uv Wrld Lah uv Lahz uv Omneeoh.

Right Etymology

right (adj.1)

"morally correct," Old English riht "just, good, fair; proper, fitting; straight, not bent, direct, erect," from Proto-Germanic *rekhtaz (source also of Old Frisian riucht "right," Old Saxon reht, Middle Dutch and Dutch recht, Old High German reht, German recht, Old Norse rettr, Gothic raihts), from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," also "to rule, to lead straight, to put right" (source also of Greek orektos "stretched out, upright;" Latin rectus "straight, right;" Old Persian rasta- "straight; right," aršta- "rectitude;" Old Irish recht "law;" Welsh rhaith, Breton reiz "just, righteous, wise").

Compare slang straight (adj.1) "honest, morally upright," and Latin rectus "right," literally "straight," Lithuanian teisus "right, true," literally "straight." Greek dikaios "just" (in the moral and legal sense) is from dike "custom." As an emphatic, meaning "you are right," it is recorded from 1580s; use as a question meaning "am I not right?" is from 1961. The sense in right whale is "justly entitled to the name." Right stuff "best human ingredients" is from 1848, popularized by Tom Wolfe's 1979 book about the first astronauts. Right of way is attested from 1767. Right angle is from late 14c.

right (adj.2)

"opposite of left," early 12c., riht, from Old English riht, which did not have this sense but meant "good, proper, fitting, straight" (see right (adj.1)). The notion is of the right hand as the "correct" hand. The usual Old English word for this was swiþra, literally "stronger." "The history of words for 'right' and 'left' shows that they were used primarily with reference to the hands" [Buck]. Similar sense evolution in Dutch recht, German recht "right (not left)," from Old High German reht, which meant only "straight, just." Compare Latin rectus "straight; right," also from the same PIE root.

The usual PIE root (*dek-) is represented by Latin dexter (see dexterity). Other derivations on a similar pattern to English right are French droit, from Latin directus "straight;" Lithuanian labas, literally "good;" and Slavic words (Bohemian pravy, Polish prawy, Russian pravyj) from Old Church Slavonic pravu, literally "straight," from PIE *pro-, from root *per- (1) "forward," hence "in front of, before, first, chief."

The political sense of "conservative" is first recorded 1794 (adj.), 1825 (n.), a translation of French Droit "the Right, Conservative Party" in the French National Assembly (1789; see left (adj.)).

right (adv.)

Old English rehte, rihte "in a straight or direct manner," from right (adj.1). Right on! as an exclamation of approval first recorded 1925 in African-American vernacular, popularized mid-1960s by Black Panther movement.

right (n.)

Old English riht (West Saxon, Kentish), reht (Anglian), "that which is morally right, duty, obligation," also "rule of conduct; law of a land;" also "what someone deserves; a just claim, what is due; correctness, truth; a legal entitlement, a privilege," from the root of right (adj.1). Meaning "the right" (as opposed to the left) is from mid-13c.; political use from 1825. From early 14c. as "a right action, a good deed." Meaning "a blow with the right fist" is from 1898. The phrase to rights "at once, straightway" is 1660s, from sense "in a proper manner" (Middle English).

right (v.)

Old English rihtan "to straighten, rule, set up, set right, amend; guide, govern; restore, replace," from riht (adj.); see right (adj.1). Compare Old Norse retta "to straighten," Old Saxon rihtian, Old Frisian riuchta, German richten, Gothic garaihtjan. Related: Righted; righting.

Right Definition:

A claim or an advantage possessed by a person or persons, which is conferred or protected by law, and which implies a corresponding duty on the part of another

Related Terms: Human Right, Human Dignity, Power, Liberty

Mostly used in the context of human rights and often confused with the very similar concepts of a power, a freedom or a liberty.

Simp Lang poem:

Eech ryt
that's rit
wuz roht.

See also:


See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rights


Human Rights in Funetik Inglish iz Heewmuhn Ryts uv RyTs uv Lahz uv Omneeonizm uv Omneeoh

International Bill Of Human Rights

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

The International Bill of Human Rights is an informal name given to one General Assembly resolution and two international treaties established by the United Nations. It consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (adopted in 1948), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966) with its two Optional Protocols and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966).1 The two covenants entered into force in 1976, after a sufficient number of countries had ratified them.

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

----- Page 1-----

Fact Sheet No.2 (Rev.1), The International Bill of Human Rights

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason

and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS (art. 1),

adopted by General Assembly resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948.

Contents:

Background

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

International Covenants on Human Rights

Worldwide influence of the International Bill of Human Rights

Annex: The International Bill of Human Rights

- Universal Declaration of Human Rights

- International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

- International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

- Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights

- Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the

abolition of the death penalty

Background

The International Bill of Human Rights consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the

International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, and the International Covenant on Civil and

Political Rights and its two Optional Protocols.

Human rights had already found expression in the Covenant of the League of Nations, which led, inter alia,

to the creation of the International Labour Organisation. At the 1945 San Francisco Conference, held to draft

the Charter of the United Nations, a proposal to embody a "Declaration on the Essential Rights of Man" was

put forward but was not examined because it required more detailed consideration than was possible at the

time. The Charter clearly speaks of "promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for

fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language or religion" (Art. 1, para. 3). The

idea of promulgating an "international bill of rights" was also considered by many as basically implicit in the

Charter.

The Preparatory Commission of the United Nations, which met immediately after the closing session of the

San Francisco Conference, recommended that the Economic and Social Council should, at its first session,

establish a commission for the promotion of human rights as envisaged in Article 68 of the Charter.

Accordingly, the Council established the Commission on Human Rights early in 1946.

At its first session, in 1946, the General Assembly considered a draft Declaration on Fundamental Human

Rights and Freedoms and transmitted it to the Economic and Social Council "for reference to the Commission

on Human Rights for consideration … in its preparation of an international bill of rights" (resolution 43 (I)).

The Commission, at its first session early in 1947, authorized its officers to formulate what it termed "a

preliminary draft International Bill of Human Rights". Later the work was taken over by a formal drafting

committee, consisting of members of the Commission from eight States, selected with due regard for

geographical distribution.

Towards the Universal Declaration

In the beginning, different views were expressed about the form the bill of rights should take. The Drafting

Committee decided to prepare two documents: one in the form of a declaration, which would set forth

general principles or standards of human rights; the other in the form of a convention, which would define
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specific rights and their limitations. Accordingly, the Committee transmitted to the Commission on Human

Rights draft articles of an international declaration and an international convention on human rights. At its

second session, in December 1947, the Commission decided to apply the term "International Bill of Human

Rights" to the series of documents in preparation and established three working groups: one on the

declaration, one on the convention (which it renamed "covenant") and one on implementation. The

Commission revised the draft declaration at its third session, in May/June 1948, taking into consideration

comments received from Governments. It did not have time, however, to consider the covenant or the

question of implementation. The declaration was therefore submitted through the Economic and Social

Council to the General Assembly, meeting in Paris.

By its resolution 217 A (III) of 10 December 1948, the General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration

of Human Rights as the first of these projected instruments.

Towards the International Covenants

On the same day that it adopted the Universal Declaration, the General Assembly requested the Commission

on Human Rights to prepare, as a matter of priority, a draft covenant on human rights and draft measures

of implementation. The Commission examined the text of the draft covenant in 1949 and the following year

it revised the first 18 articles, on the basis of comments received from Governments. In 1950, the General

Assembly declared that "the enjoyment of civic and political freedoms and of economic, social and cultural

rights are interconnected and interdependent" (resolution 421 (V), sect. E). The Assembly thus decided to

include in the covenant on human rights economic, social and cultural rights and an explicit recognition of

the equality of men and women in related rights, as set forth in the Charter. In 1951, the Commission

drafted 14 articles on economic, social and cultural rights on the basis of proposals made by Governments

and suggestions by specialized agencies. It also formulated 10 articles on measures for implementation of

those rights under which States parties to the covenant would submit periodic reports. After a long debate

at its sixth session, in 1951/1952, the General Assembly requested the Commission "to draft two Covenants

on Human Rights, … one to contain civil and political rights and the other to contain economic, social and

cultural rights" (resolution 543 (VI), para. 1). The Assembly specified that the two covenants should contain

as many similar provisions as possible. It also decided to include an article providing that "all peoples shall

have the right of self-determination" (resolution 545 (VI)).

The Commission completed preparation of the two drafts at its ninth and tenth sessions, in 1953 and 1954.

The General Assembly reviewed those texts at its ninth session, in 1954, and decided to give the drafts the

widest possible publicity in order that Governments might study them thoroughly and that public opinion

might express itself freely. It recommended that its Third Committee start an article-by-article discussion of

the texts at its tenth session, in 1955. Although the article-by-article discussion began as scheduled, it was

not until 1966 that the preparation of the two covenants was completed.

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and the International Covenant on Civil

and Political Rights were adopted by the General Assembly by its resolution 2200 A (XXI) of 16 December

1966. The first Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, adopted by the

same resolution, provided international machinery for dealing with communications from individuals claiming

to be victims of violations of any of the rights set forth in the Covenant.

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted and proclaimed by the General Assembly

as a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations, to the end that every individual and

every organ of society, keeping this Declaration constantly in mind, shall strive by teaching and education to

promote respect for these rights and freedoms and by progressive measures, national and international, to

secure their universal and effective recognition and observance, both among, the peoples of Member States

themselves and among the peoples of territories under their jurisdiction.

Forty-eight States voted in favour of the Declaration, none against, with eight abstentions. In a statement

following the voting, the President of the General Assembly pointed out that adoption of the Declaration was

"a remarkable achievement, a step forward in the great evolutionary process. It was the first occasion on
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which the organized community of nations had made a Declaration of human rights and fundamental

freedoms. The instrument was backed by the authority of the body of opinion of the United Nations as a

whole, and millions of people -men, women and children all over the world- would turn to it for help,

guidance and inspiration.

The Declaration consists of a preamble and 30 articles, setting forth the human rights and fundamental

freedoms to which all men and women, everywhere in the world, are entitled, without any discrimination.

Article 1, which lays down the philosophy on which the Declaration is based, reads:

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and

conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

The article thus defines the basic assumptions of the Declaration: that the right to liberty and equality is

man's birthright and cannot be alienated: and that, because man is a rational and moral being, he is

different from other creatures on earth and therefore entitled to certain rights and freedoms which other

creatures do not enjoy.

Article 2, which sets out the basic principle of equality and non discrimination as regards the enjoyment of

human rights and fundamental freedoms, forbids "distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex,

language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status".

Article 3, the first cornerstone of the Declaration, proclaims the right to life, liberty and security of person -a

right essential to the enjoyment of all other rights. This article introduces articles 4 to 21, in which other civil

and political rights are set out, including: freedom from slavery and servitude; freedom from torture and

cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; the right to recognition everywhere as a person

before the law; the right to an effective judicial remedy; freedom from arbitrary arrest, detention or exile;

the right to a fair trial and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal; the right to be presumed

innocent until proved guilty; freedom from arbitrary interference with privacy, family, home or

correspondence; freedom of movement and residence; the right of asylum; the right to a nationality; the

right to marry and to found a family; the right to own property; freedom of thought, conscience and

religion; freedom of opinion and expression; the right to peaceful assembly and association; and the right to

take part in the government of one's country and to equal access to public service in one's country.

Article 22, the second cornerstone of the Declaration, introduces articles 23 to 27, in which economic, social

and cultural rights -the rights to which everyone is entitled "as a member of society" -are set out. The article

characterizes these rights as indispensable for human dignity and the free development of personality, and

indicates that they are to be realized "through national effort and international cooperation". At the same

time, it points out the limitations of realization, the extent of which depends on the resources of each State.

The economic, social and cultural rights recognized in articles 22 to 27 include the right to social security;

the right to work; the right to equal pay for equal work; the right to rest and leisure; the right to a standard

of living adequate for health and well-being; the right to education; and the right to participate in the

cultural life of the community.

The concluding articles, articles 28 to 30, recognize that everyone is entitled to a social and international

order in which the human rights and fundamental freedoms set forth in the Declaration may be fully

realized, and stress the duties and responsibilities which each individual owes to his community. Article 29

states that "in the exercise of his rights and freedoms, everyone shall be subject only to such limitations as

are determined by law solely for the purpose of securing due recognition and respect for the rights and

freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public order and the general welfare in

a democratic society". It adds that in no case may human rights and fundamental freedoms be exercised

contrary to the purposes and principles of the United Nations. Article 30 emphasizes that no State, group or

person may claim any right, under the Declaration, "to engage in any activity or to perform any act aimed at

the destruction of any of the rights and freedoms set forth" in the Declaration.

Importance and influence of the Declaration
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Conceived as "a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations", the Universal Declaration

of Human Rights has become just that: a yardstick by which to measure the degree of respect for, and

compliance with, international human rights standards.

Since 1948 it has been and rightly continues to be the most important and far-reaching of all United Nations

declarations, and a fundamental source of inspiration for national and international efforts to promote and

protect human rights and fundamental freedoms. It has set the direction for all subsequent work in the field

of human rights and has provided the basic philosophy for many legally binding international instruments

designed to protect the rights and freedoms which it proclaims.

In the Proclamation of Teheran, adopted by the International Conference on Human Rights held in Iran in

1968, the Conference agreed that "the Universal Declaration of Human Rights states a common

understanding of the peoples of the world concerning the inalienable and inviolable rights of all members of

the human family and constitutes an obligation for the members of the international community". The

Conference affirmed its faith in the principles set forth in the Declaration, and urged all peoples and

Governments "to dedicate themselves to [those] principles … and to redouble their efforts to provide for all

human beings a life consonant with freedom and dignity and conducive to physical, mental, social and

spiritual welfare".

In recent years, there has been a growing tendency for United Nations organs, in preparing international

instruments in the filed of human rights, to refer not only to the Universal Declaration, but also to other

parts of the International Bill of Human Rights.

International Covenants on Human Rights

The preambles and articles 1, 3 and 5 of the Two International Covenants are almost identical. The

preambles recall the obligation of States under the Charter of the United Nations to promote human rights;

remind the individual of his responsibility to strive for the promotion and observance of those rights; and

recognize that, in accordance with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the ideal of free human

beings enjoying civil and political freedom and freedom from fear and want can be achieved only if

conditions are created whereby everyone may enjoy his civil and political rights, as well as his economic,

social and cultural rights.

Article 1 of each Covenant states that the right to self-determination is universal and calls upon States to

promote the realization of that right and to respect it.

The article provides that "All peoples have the right of self-determination" and adds that "By virtue of that

right they freely determine their political status and freely pursue their economic, social and cultural

development". Article 3, in both cases, reaffirms the equal right of men and women to the enjoyment of all

human rights, and enjoins States to make that principle a reality. Article 5, in both cases, provides

safeguards against the destruction or undue limitation of any human right or fundamental freedom, and

against misinterpretation of any provision of the Covenants as a means of justifying infringement of a right

or freedom or its restriction to a greater extent than provided for in the Covenants. It also prevents States

from limiting rights already enjoyed within their territories on the ground that such rights are not

recognized, or recognized to a lesser extent, in the Covenants.

Articles 6 to 15 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights recognize the rights to

work (art. 6); to the enjoyment of just and favourable conditions of work (art. 7); to form and join trade

unions (art. 8); to social security, including social insurance (art. 9); to the widest possible protection and

assistance for the family, especially mothers, children and young persons (art. 10); to an adequate standard

of living (art. I 1); to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health (art.

12); to education (arts. 13 and 14); and to take part in cultural life (art. 15).

In its articles 6 to 27, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights protects the right to life (art.

6) and lays down that no one is to be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or

punishment (art. 7); that no one is to be held in slavery; that slavery and the slave-trade are to be

prohibited; and that no one is to be held in servitude or required to perform forced or compulsory labour

(art. 8); that no one is to be subjected to arbitrary arrest or detention (art. 9); that all persons deprived of
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their liberty are to be treated with humanity (art. 10); and that no one is to be imprisoned merely on the

ground of inability to fulfil a contractual obligation (art. 11).

The Covenant provides for freedom of movement and freedom to choose a residence (art. 12) and for

limitations to be placed on the expulsion of aliens lawfully in the territory of a State party (art. 13). It makes

provision for the equality of all persons before the courts and tribunals and for guarantees in criminal and

civil proceedings (art. 14). It prohibits retroactive criminal legislation (art. 15); lays down the right of

everyone to recognition everywhere as a person before the law (art. 16); and calls for the prohibition of

arbitrary or unlawful interference with an individual's privacy, family, home or correspondence, and of

unlawful attacks on his honour and reputation (art. 17).

The Covenant provides for protection of the rights to freedom of thought, conscience and religion (art. 18)

and to freedom of opinion and expression (art. 19). It calls for the prohibition by law of any propaganda for

war and of any advocacy of national, racial or religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination,

hostility or violence (art. 20). It recognizes the right of peaceful assembly (art. 21) and the right to freedom

of association (art. 22). It also recognizes the right of men and women of marriageable age to marry and to

found a family, and the principle of equality of rights and responsibilities of spouses as to marriage, during

marriage and at its dissolution (art. 23). It lays down measures to protect the rights of children (art. 24),

and recognizes the right of every citizen to take part in the conduct of public affairs, to vote and to be

elected, and to have access, on general terms of equality, to public service in his country (art. 25). It

provides that all persons are equal before the law and are entitled to equal protection of the law (art. 26). It

also calls for protection of the rights of ethnic, religious and linguistic minorities in the territories of States

parties (art. 27).

Finally, article 28 provides for the establishment of a Human Rights Committee responsible for supervising

implementation of the rights set out in the Covenant.

Conditions

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights affirms that the exercise of a person's rights and freedoms may

be subject to certain limitations, which must be determined by law, solely for the purpose of securing due

recognition of the rights and freedoms of others and of meeting the just requirements of morality, public

order and the general welfare in a democratic society. Rights may not be exercised contrary to the purposes

and principles of the United Nations, or if they are aimed at destroying any of the rights set forth in the

Declaration (arts. 29 and 30).

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights states that the rights provided for

therein may be limited by law, but only in so far as it is compatible with the nature of the rights and solely

to promote the general welfare in a democratic society (art. 4).

Unlike the Universal Declaration and the Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, the International

Covenant on Civil and Political Rights contains no general provision applicable to all the rights provided for in

the Covenant authorizing restrictions on their exercise. However, several articles in the Covenant provide

that the rights being dealt with shall not be subject to any restrictions except those which are prescribed by

law and are necessary to protect national security, public order, or the rights and freedoms of others.

Certain rights, therefore, may never be suspended or limited, even in emergency situations. These are the

rights to life, to freedom from torture, to freedom from enslavement or servitude, to protection from

imprisonment for debt, to freedom from retroactive penal laws, to recognition as a person before the law,

and to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.

The Covenant on Civil and Political Rights allows a State to limit or suspend the enjoyment of certain rights

in cases of officially proclaimed public emergencies which threaten the life of the nation. Such limitations or

suspensions are permitted only "to the extent strictly required by the exigencies of the situation" and may

never involve discrimination solely on the ground of race, colour, sex, language, religion or social origin (art.

4). The limitations or suspensions must also be reported to the United Nations.

First Optional Protocol
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The first Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights enables the Human

Rights Committee, set up under that Covenant, to receive and consider communications from individuals

claiming to be victims of violations of any of the rights set forth in the Covenant.

Under article I of the Optional Protocol, a State party to the Covenant that becomes a party to the Protocol

recognizes the competence of the Human Rights Committee to receive and consider communications from

individuals subject to its jurisdiction who claim to be victims of a violation by that State of any of the rights

set forth in the Covenant. Individuals who make such a claim, and who have exhausted all available

domestic remedies, are entitled to submit a written communication to the Committee (art. 2).

Such communications as are determined to be admissible by the Committee (in addition to article 2, articles

3 and 5 (2) lay down conditions for admissibility) are brought to the attention of the State party alleged to

be violating a provision of the Covenant. Within six months, that State must submit to the Committee

written explanations or statements clarifying the matter and indicating the remedy, if any, that it may have

applied (art. 4).

The Human Rights Committee considers the admissible communications, at closed meetings, in the light of

all written information made available to it by the individual and the State party concerned. It then forwards

its views to the State party and to the individual (art. 5).

A summary of the Committee's activities under the Optional Protocol is included in the report which it

submits annually to the General Assembly through the Economic and Social Council (art. 6).

Second Optional Protocol

The Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the

abolition of the death penalty, was adopted by the General Assembly by its resolution 44/128 of 15

December 1989. Under its article 1, no one within the jurisdiction of a State party to the Protocol may be

executed.

Under article 3 of the Protocol, States parties must include in the reports which they submit to the Human

Rights Committee information on measures taken to give effect to the Protocol.

Article 5 of the Second Optional Protocol provides that, with respect to any State party to the first Optional

Protocol, the competence of the Human Rights Committee to receive and consider communications from

individuals subject to that State's jurisdiction shall extend to the provisions of the Second Optional Protocol,

unless the State party concerned has made a statement to the contrary at the moment of ratification or

accession.

Under article 6, the provisions of the Second Optional Protocol apply as additional provisions to the

Covenant.

Entry into force of the Covenants and the Optional Protocols

The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights entered into force on 3 January 1976,

three months after the date of deposit with the Secretary-General of the thirty-fifth instrument of ratification

or accession, as provided in article 27. As at 30 September 1995, the Covenant had been ratified or acceded

to by 132 States:

Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belarus,

Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada,

Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia,

Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic,

Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia,

Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India,

Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia,

Lebanon, Lesotho, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Malta,

Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua,
----- Page 7-----
Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic

of Moldova, Romania, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Senegal,

Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian

Arab Republic, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Ukraine,

United Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Uruguay, Venezuela, Viet Nam,

Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zaire, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights entered into force on 23 March 1976, three months

after the date of deposit with the Secretary-General of the thirty-fifth instrument of ratification or accession,

as provided in article 49. As at 30 September 1995, the Covenant had been ratified or acceded to by 132

States:

Afghanistan, Albania, Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Barbados, Belarus,

Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada,

Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia,

Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Denmark, Dominica, Dominican Republic,

Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia,

Germany, Grenada, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Hungary, Iceland, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of),

Iraq, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Libyan

Arab Jamahiriya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Mongolia,

Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Norway,

Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Republic of Moldova, Romania,

Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, San Marino, Senegal, Seychelles, Slovakia,

Slovenia, Somalia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian Arab Republic, The

former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Uganda, Ukraine, United

Kingdom, United Republic of Tanzania, United States of America, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Venezuela, Viet

Nam, Yemen, Yugoslavia, Zaire, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

As at the same date, 44 States parties to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights had made

the declaration under its article 41, recognizing the competence of the Human Rights Committee "to receive

and consider communications to the effect that a State Party claims that another State Party is not fulfilling

its obligations" under the Covenant. The provisions of article 41 entered into force on 28 March 1979 in

accordance with paragraph 2 of that article.

The first Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights entered into force

simultaneously with the Covenant, having received the minimum 10 ratifications or accessions required. As

at 30 September 1995, 85 States parties to the Covenant had also become parties to the first Optional

Protocol:

Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Armenia, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia

and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, Colombia, Congo,

Costa Rica, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea,

Estonia, Finland, France, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Guinea, Guyana, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy,

Jamaica, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Madagascar, Malta, Mauritius,

Mongolia, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru,

Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Russian Federation, Saint Vincent and the

Grenadines, San Marino, Senegal, Seychelles, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, Spain, Suriname, Sweden, The

former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Trinidad and Tobago, Ukraine, Uruguay, Uzbekistan,

Venezuela, Zaire and Zambia.

The Second Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, aiming at the

abolition of the death penalty, entered into force on 11 July 1991, having received the minimum 10

ratifications or accessions required. As at 30 September 1995, the Protocol had been ratified or acceded to

by 28 States:

Australia, Austria, Denmark, Ecuador, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg,

Malta, Mozambique, Namibia, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Portugal, Romania, Seychelles,

Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Uruguay and Venezuela.
----- Page 8-----
Worldwide influence of the International Bill of Human Rights

From 1948, when the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted and proclaimed, until 1976, when

the International Covenants on Human Rights entered into force, the Declaration was the only completed

portion of the International Bill of Human Rights. The Declaration, and at a later stage the Covenants,

exercised a profound influence on the thoughts and actions of individuals and their Governments in all parts

of the world.

The International Conference on Human Rights, which met at Teheran from 22 April to 13 May 1968 to

review the progress made in the 20 years since the adoption of the Universal Declaration and to formulate a

programme for the future, solemnly declared in the Proclamation of Teheran:

1 . It is imperative that the members of the international community fulfil their solemn obligations to

promote and encourage respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms for all without distinctions of

any kind such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinions;

2. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights states a common understanding, of the peoples of the world

concerning the inalienable and inviolable rights of all members of the human family and constitutes an

obligation for the members of the international community;

3. The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, the International Covenant on Economic, Social

and Cultural Rights, the Declaration on the Granting of Independence to Colonial Countries and Peoples, the

International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination as well as other

conventions and declarations in the field of human rights adopted under the auspices of the United Nations,

the specialized agencies and the regional intergovernmental organizations, have created new standards and

obligations to which States should conform;

Thus, for more than 25 years, the Universal Declaration on Human Rights stood alone as an international

"standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations". It became known and was accepted as

authoritative both in States which became parties to one or both of the Covenants and in those which did

not ratify or accede to either. Its provisions were cited as the basis and justification for many important

decisions taken by United Nations bodies; they inspired the preparation of a number of international human

rights instruments, both within and outside the United Nations system; they exercised a significant influence

on a number of multilateral and bilateral treaties; and they had a strong impact as the basis for the

preparation of many new national constitutions and national laws.

The Universal Declaration came to be recognized as a historic document articulating a common definition of

human dignity and values. The Declaration is a yardstick by which to measure the degree of respect for, and

compliance with, international human rights standards everywhere on earth.

The coming into force of the Covenants, by which States parties accepted a legal as well as a moral

obligation to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms, did not in any way diminish the

widespread influence of the Universal Declaration. On the contrary, the very existence of the Covenants, and

the fact that they contain the measures of implementation required to ensure the realization of the rights

and freedoms set out in the Declaration, gives greater strength to the Declaration.

Moreover, the Universal Declaration is truly universal in scope, as it preserves its validity for every member

of the human family, everywhere, regardless of whether or not Governments have formally accepted its

principles or ratified the Covenants. On the other hand, the Covenants, by their nature as multilateral

conventions, are legally binding only on those States which have accepted them by ratification or accession.

In many important resolutions and decisions adopted by United Nations bodies, including the General

Assembly and the Security Council, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and one or both Covenants

have been cited as the basis for action.
----- Page 9-----
Nearly all the international human rights instruments adopted by United Nations bodies since 1948 elaborate

principles set out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The International Covenant on Economic,

Social and Cultural Rights states in its preamble that it developed out of recognition of the fact that

in accordance with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the ideal of free human beings enjoyin

freedom from fear and want can only be achieved if conditions are created whereby everyone may enjoy his

economic, social and cultural rights, as well as his civil and political rights.

A similar statement is made in the preamble to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.

The Declaration on the Protection of All Persons from Being Subjected to Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman

or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, adopted by the General Assembly in 1975 (resolution 3452 (XXX)),

spells out the meaning of article 5 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and article 7 of the

International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, both of which provide that no one may be subjected to

torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. This prohibition was further reinforced

by the adoption in 1984 of the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading

Treatment or Punishment (General Assembly resolution 39/46). Similarly, the Declaration on the Elimination

of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief, proclaimed by the General

Assembly in 1981 (resolution 36/55); clearly defines the nature and scope of the principles of non

discrimination and equality before the law and the right to freedom of thought, conscience, religion and

belief contained in the Universal Declaration and the International Covenants.

A similar situation prevails as regards international human rights instruments adopted outside the United

Nations system. For example, the preamble to the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and

Fundamental Freedoms, adopted by the Council of Europe at Rome in 1950, concludes with the following

words:

Being resolved, as the Governments of European countries which are like-minded and have a common

heritage of political traditions, ideals, freedom and the rule of law, to take the first steps for the collective

enforcement of certain of the rights stated in the Universal Declaration;

Article II of the Charter of the Organization of African Unity, adopted at Addis Ababa in 1963, provides that

one of the purposes of the Organization is "to promote international cooperation, having due regard to the

Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights". The American Convention on

Human Rights, signed at San José, Costa Rica, in 1969, states in its preamble that the principles to which it

gives effect are those set forth in the Charter of the Organization of American States, in the American

Declaration of the Rights and Duties of Man, and in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Judges of the International Court of Justice have occasionally invoked principles contained in the

International Bill of Human Rights as a basis for their decisions.

National and local tribunals have frequently cited principles set out in the International Bill of Human Rights

in their decisions. Moreover, in recent years, national constitutional and legislative texts have increasingly

provided measures of legal protection for those principles; indeed, many recent national and local laws are

clearly modelled on provisions set forth in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International

Covenants, which remain a beacon for all present and future efforts in the field of human rights, both

nationally and internationally.

Finally, the World Conference on Human Rights, held at Vienna in June 1993, adopted by acclamation the

Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, in which it welcomed the progress made in the codification of

human rights instruments and urged the universal ratification of human rights treaties. In addition, all

States were encouraged to avoid, as far as possible, the resort to reservations (part 1, para. 26).

Thus the International Bill of Human Rights represents a milestone in the history of human

rights, a veritable Magna Carta marking mankind's arrival at a vitally important phase: the

conscious acquisition of human dignity and worth.

Printed at United Nations, Geneva

June 1996


InterPol ubowt Human rights

“[I]t is essential, if man is not to be compelled to have recourse, as a last resort, to rebellion against tyranny and oppression,that human rights should be protected by the rule of law.”

The International Bill of Human Rights is an informal name given to one UN General Assembly resolution and two international treaties established by the United Nations. It consists of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (adopted in 1948), the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (1966) with its two Optional Protocols and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966). The two covenants entered into force in 1976, after a sufficient number of countries had ratified them.

Preamble, Universal Declaration of Human Rights

In this era where the importance of human rights is increasingly emphasized, INTERPOL continually strives to promote respect for and the observance of such principles, in the context of the Organization’s mandate.

Background

On 10 December 1948, the United Nations General Assembly adopted and proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the “common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations”. By doing so, the United Nations General Assembly recognized, for the first time, the “inherent dignity” and the “equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family”.

Since then, the principles enshrined in the UniversaL DecLaraTion of Human RighTs have been widely considered to have attained the status of customary international law. The obligation in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights – to ensure a minimum level of respect for an individual’s most essential rights stemming from his existence as a human being – is not only limited to states; it extends to actors on the international scene as well.

As stated in the Vienna Declaration, which was adopted by the World Conference on Human Rights on 25 June 1993; “all human rights are universal, indivisible and interrelated. The international community must treat human rights globally in a fair and equal manner, on the same footing, and with the same emphasis.”

INTERPOL's response
To this end, INTERPOL has strived not only to refrain from any possible infringements of human rights, but also to actively promote the protection of human rights, where it is deemed necessary, in the context of the Organization’s mandate.

The importance of respect for human rights has been recognized by INTERPOL since the early days of the Organization. In INTERPOL’s General Assembly Resolution no. 3 of 1949, it was emphasized that “all acts of violence or inhuman treatment, that is to say those contrary to human dignity committed by the police in the exercise of their judicial and criminal police duties, must be denounced to justice”.

This respect for human rights is now enshrined in Article 2 of INTERPOL’s Constitution, which mandates the Organization to ensure and promote international police cooperation “in the spirit of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights”.

It is further emphasized in Article 2(a) of INTERPOL’s Rules on the Processing of Information, which provides that information is to be processed by the Organization or through its channels “with due respect for the basic rights of individuals in conformity with Article 2 of the Organization’s Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights”.

Practical examples
In practical terms, INTERPOL’s commitment to respect human rights is demonstrated through several initiatives.

Cooperation with international courts and tribunals
Firstly, the Organization cooperates closely with international courts and tribunals whose mandates envisage the prosecution and conviction of those who commit what are widely considered to be the most severe atrocities committed by man.

So far, cooperation has been established by agreements between INTERPOL and the following bodies:

International Criminal Court;
International Criminal Tribunal for former Yugoslavia;
International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda;
Special Court for Sierra Leone;
Special Tribunal for Lebanon.

For example, in the case of the Tribunal for former Yugoslavia, the basis for its co-operation with INTERPOL is to found in Article 39 of the Tribunal's Rules of Procedure and Evidence (adopted in 1994), which states that "in the conduct of an investigation, the Prosecutor may seek … the assistance … of any relevant international body, including the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL)".

As for the [[International Criminal Court]]], it is expressly provided in Article 87 (1)(b) of the Court Statute itself that "when appropriate, without prejudice to the provisions of subparagraph (a), requests may also be transmitted through the International Criminal Police Organization[…]".

INTERPOL provides assistance to these courts and tribunals through the publication of notices and support in the search for fugitives. The INTERPOL General Assembly has also authorized increased support from INTERPOL in the investigation and prosecution of genocide, war crimes, and crimes against humanity in Resolution AG-2004-RES-17.

Processing of personal information
Secondly, the Organization ensures that human rights are respected during the processing of personal information by the Organization or through its channels. This role is fulfilled not only by the General Secretariat itself but also by the Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files.

The Commission is an independent body whose tasks include ensuring that the rules and operations relating to the processing of personal information by INTERPOL, and particularly INTERPOL’s projects to create new files or new methods of circulating personal information, do not infringe the basic rights of the people concerned, as referred to in Article 2 of the Organization’s Constitution.

The independent Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files is also responsible for processing requests for access to INTERPOL’s files, including requests for correction or deletions.

General Assembly Resolution
Another way in which INTERPOL’s observance of human rights has been translated into practice is through INTERPOL’s General Assembly Resolution AGN/63/RES/16 (Rome, 1994).

This resolution emphasized the importance of work done by INTERPOL to protect basic human rights, and recommended that Member states adopt measures designed to ensure that training on human rights is provided in police colleges.

The importance of providing training on human rights to police personnel, in order to strengthen international cooperation, was recognized. A circular letter was subsequently sent to member states, requesting them to keep the General Secretariat informed of all developments concerning the implementation of this resolution.

It should be further noted that INTERPOL works in close cooperation with the United Nations Human Rights Council (formerly the United Nations Commission on Human Rights), participating regularly in their sessions and seminars.

See Also:


RyTs Uhv Annimmulz

Recognition of the Rights of Animals and Nature In the Federation of Earth

Recognizing that, in the words of Sir Muhammad Zafrulla Khan, the human being must be a source of bliss for every being; recognizing also that the human being is not the only source of bliss;

Recognizing that, in the words of Sri Krishna, all are one–and that, in the words of Albert Schweitzer, the way back to civilization lies through the reverence for life;

Aware, as stated in the Preamble to the Constitution for the Federation of Earth, of the interdependence of people, nations and all life–and aware that man’s abuse of science and technology has brought humanity also to the brink of ecological catastrophe;

Recognizing that, as described in the Global 2000 Report to the President of the United States, the destruction of the natural world has progressed to an advanced stage, to a stage where, many authorities agree, within 30 to 50 years perhaps 50% or more of the world’s animal species will have become extinct–
unless the prevalent attitude of humanity toward the status of animals changes radically;

Recognizing that, at least since the time of Darwin, it has been scientifically established that humankind shares in significant degree a common origin with the rest of the natural world and especially with its animal species;

Recognizing that, with few exceptions, under present law the inhumane treatment of animals is common practice in scientific laboratories, factory farms, and at the hands of hunters and trappers–and that present national basic laws do little to implement an ethic of the protection of nature;

Recognizing that we need to be concerned not only with the future of humanity, but also, under the Constitution for the Federation of Earth, with the fate of the planet;

Recognizing, finally, that under the Call to the Provisional World Parliament, the business of the World Parliament includes a concern with global environmental protection;

And as an expression of love;

THEREFORE, be it enacted by this provisional World Parliament in first session, 1982:

1. From the date of adoption of this resolution by the provisional World Parliament, in all considerations and decisions bearing upon the present conditions and future of humanity, the Earth Federation shall consider the interests of other species.

2. From the date of adoption of this resolution by the Provisional World Parliament,

the following activities are strongly discouraged or prohibited:

2.1. All practices of factory farming involving animals;

2.2. Research using animals as experimental subjects, of the trapping and hunting of animals

except by peoples for their own subsistence use, and not including for cash sales or trade;

2.3. Employment of animals in cruel sport;

2.4. Removal of species from native habitat, in disregard of protective standards for removals;

2.5. Production of so-called animal “products” for profit.

3. The provisional World Parliament and

provisional World Government shall establish a World Environmental Protection Agency, which shall include

in the scope of its responsibilities the implementation of this resolution and the supervision of the

establishment of the recognition of rights of animal throughout the world.

(See WLA#9 summary or full text, first adopted 1987, 3rd session, revised 2004, 8th session.)

4. Until a more fully operative democratic world federation is established, the World Environmental Protection Agency is responsible to the provisional World Parliament, and to any provisional World Cabinet that is created by the provisional World Parliament. The World Environmental Protection Agency has a Board of Trustees of twenty-five members, to be appointed by the provisional World Cabinet, to be drawn from all parts of the Earth, and to include no fewer than five well-known advocates of animal rights. The Board of Trustees shall determine the organization and functioning of the World Environmental Protection Agency in accordance with the terms of this resolution and in conformance with the Constitution for the Federation of Earth, while at all times responsible to the Cabinet and Parliament. No nation may have veto powers in the decisions of the World Environmental Protection Agency.

5. At subsequent sessions of the provisional World Parliament, the Parliament will review implementation of this resolution, and will take further action as appropriate.

  • * * * * * * * * *

Above adopted 6th September 1982, at Brighton, England, first session of the Provisional World Parliament. First draft was written by John Stockwell. The work was introduced by Sally Curry, delegate Member of the Parliament from Canada.

Attested:

Eugenia Almand, JD, Secretary
Provisional World Parliament

See Life Essential Nutrition ANd|Ohr Animal Essential Nutrition And|Ohr Essential Nutrients For Humans Fohr Leengks Tu Vegan And VegeTarian Food OpTs For BeesTs And UhThr AnimaLs.


RTh SihTihZen RyTs Uhv RTh Fed KonsTihTuushuhn And Meewnissipul Kohr Lahz

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 0: The inhabitants and citizens of Earth who are within the Federation of Earth shall have certain inalienable rights defined hereunder. It shall be mandatory for the World Parliament, the World Executive, and all organs and agencies of the World Government to honor, implement and enforce these rights, as well as for the national governments of all member nations in the Federation of Earth to do likewise. Individuals or groups suffering violation or neglect of such rights shall have full recourse through the World Ombudsmus, the Enforcement System and the World Courts for redress of grievances. The inalienable rights shall include the following:

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 1: Equal rights for all citizens of the Federation of Earth, with no discrimination on grounds of race, color, caste, nationality, sex, religion, political affiliation, property, or social status.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 2: Equal protection and application of world legislation and world laws for all citizens of the Federation of Earth.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 3: Freedom of thought and conscience, speech, press, writing, communication, expression, publication, broadcasting, telecasting, and cinema, except as an overt part of or incitement to violence, armed riot or insurrection.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 4: Freedom of assembly, association, organization, petition and peaceful demonstration.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 5: Freedom to vote without duress, and freedom for political organization and campaigning without censorship or recrimination.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 6: Freedom to profess, practice and promote religious or religious beliefs or no religion or religious belief.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 7: Freedom to profess and promote political beliefs or no political beliefs.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 8: Freedom for investigation And research and reporting.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 9: Freedom to travel without passport or visas or other forms of registration used to limit travel between, among or within nations.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 10: Prohibition against slavery, peonage, involuntary servitude, and conscription of labor.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 11: Prohibition against military conscription.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12: Safety of person from arbitrary or unreasonable arrest, detention, exile, search or seizure; Requirement of warrants for searches and arrests. [ See: Peeuur JusT WohrehnTs Fohr Srch AkTs And UhrehsTs ]

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 13: Prohibition against physical or psychological duress or torture during any period of investigation, arrest, detention or imprisonment, and against cruel or unusual punishment.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 14: Right of habeas corpus; no ex-post-facto laws; Vrss 0: no double jeopardy; right to refuse self-incrimination or the incrimination of another.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 15: Prohibition against private armies and paramilitary organizations as being threats to the common peace and safety.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 16: Safety of property from arbitrary seizure; protection against exercise of the power of eminent domain without reasonable compensation.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 17: Right to family planning and free public assistance to achieve family planning objectives.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 18: Right of privacy of person, family and association; prohibition against surveillance as a means of political control.


Pure JusT WarrenTs For Searches And ArresTs

Peeuur JusT WohrehnTs Fohr Srch AkTs And UhrehsTs

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:1: Safety of person from arbitrary or unreasonable arrest, detention, exile, search or seizure;

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:2:0: ReekwyrmehnT Uhv WohrehnTs Fohr Srch AkTs And UhrehsTs.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:2:1:0: Thehr Ahr SimpLee Now 2 Lrnd JusT Reezuhnz Fohr Uh Srch WohrehnT.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:2:1:1: If { Ther Wuhz Uh SeLf giltee Uhv AkTeeng OwT Uh Kung Fu FyT Skill Typ Deskrybd Az uhtak With Wuhn wehpuhn tuul Ohr mohr than wuhn wehpuhn tuulz that myt ( hahrm = ( { injur ( Uh Lyv BeesT WiTH Wrkeeng Nrvz ) } ohr|and { dammejyz ( Uh Muhsheen WiTh Wrkeeng EeLekTronniks ) } leeveeng uh ( hahrmd = ( injurd wuund ohr damajd damaj ) ) that kozd Less Fuhngkshuhn Uhv ThaT Wrkeeng Tek } ThaT Wuhz Pruuvd By ( FohToh Ohr|And Vid Ohr|And [ Uh hahrmd VikTim'z Reekohrded STaeeTmenT ] Ohr|And [ Uh WiTness'z Reekohrded STaeeTmenT ] ) Ehvihdehnss Pruuveeng ThaT an ObjekTiv hahrm uhsult vyohlaeeshuhn krym uhkrd } Then ThaT krym Ehvihdehnss Shood GeT Eeuuzd Az Baeesis Fohr Uh ** WohrehnT Fohr JusT Seezhur Uhv [ Eech And Ehvree ] hahrm uhsult wehpuhn Uhv Thuh spehsiffik [ typ ohr typs ] pruuvd tu hav got eewzd tu kuhmit thuh hahrm uhsult krym**.

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:2:1:2: If Ther Iz A Self Huu Iz InnuhsenT Uhv hahrm-wehpuhn-uhsult with ThaT SehLf's JusTLee Uhkwyrd Tu Ohn ProppurTee Wich got unreezuhnuhbullee ahrbitrehrihlee theft seezd Then ThaT theft rongd InnuhsenT SeLF MyT LisT [ Eech And Ehvree ] theft stohld AeeTem And SpehsihfihkuLLee How ThaT AeeTem Wuhz JusTLee Uhkwyred, PreefurruhbLee WiTh uh ReeseeT. THaT JusT[[Lee]]] Uhkwyrd LisT ReepohrT Shood GeT InvesTihgaeeTed Tu Vehrihfy THuh Degree Uhv ITs VaLLihdihTee Then Tu Thuh Degree VaLidaeeTed Eeuuzd Az Thuh Baeesis Fohr Thuh Ishuuanss Uhv Uh WohrehnT Fohr Reezuhnd JusT Seezhur Uhv ThefT STohL ProprTee

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:0: Ther Ahr Now 2 Lrnd JusT Reezuhnz Fohr An UhrehsT WohrehnT:

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:1: Thuh FrsT Iz Tu Az Suun Az PossihbuL STop Uhv hahrm uhsult vyohlaeeshuhn krym And Therby PreevenT Thuh kuhnTihnuueeng uhv hahrm uhsult krym akts;

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:0: Thuh Sehkuhnd Iz If Wen ( { uh pland mrdr } ohr {multi pland mrdrz } ) haz uhkrd Then Shood InvesTihgaeeshuhn Syenss Branch Kyndz Deskrybd Az DeeTekTiv Fohrenzikss PrakTiss AkTss Uhkr ReezuLTeeng WiTh HohpfuLLee UhresTeeng { theft and|ohr uhsuLt and|ohr mrdr } suspektss.


DeeTekTiv Fohrenzikss Branch Kyndz Deskrybd AT https://www.thebalancecareers.com/detective-and-criminal-investigator-job-information-974467 fohr UhresTing { theft and|ohr uhsuLt and|ohr mrdr } suspects:

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:1: ( ThefT & UhsuLT & MrdR ) krym PLaeess InvesTihgaeeshuhn
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:2: Evidence collection
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:3: AhTopsee
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:4: WiTness Intrveewz
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:5: ReepohrT RyTeeng
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:6: Record keeping
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:7: Writing probable cause affidavits
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:8: Preparing arrest warrants
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:9: Courtroom testimony
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:10: Preparing and executing search warrants
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:11: UhresTeeng ( ThefT And|AiThr UhsuLT And|AiThr Mrdr ) SuspekTs
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:12: KohrT Fohrenziks TryuL
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:13: KohrT Jurree { DeeLibraeeshuhnz Then KuhnkLuuzhuhnz }
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:14: KohrT Juj Adjuudihkaeeshuhn
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:15: Krym SuhspekT { PeenuLyzd PehnuLTee And|Ohr ReeLeesT }


RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:0: Krym PehnuLTeez InkLuud:

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:0: Ishuu Peeuur JusT WahrenT Tu:

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:1: Seez Theef ThefT STohL Suudoh-ProprTee

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:2: And|AeeThr Uhsess STohL ProprTee WrTh Az Neg DeT BaLLanss Uhv Nuu DeT UhkownT Uhv Hyrd DeT KohLehkshuhn Aeejehnsee Tu GradjuuaLLee RehgeeuuLrLee KohLehkT DeT PaeemehnTs Tu GeT Fohrwrded Tu STohL Fruhm VikTim.
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:3: And|AeeThr Seez Ohprehsohr Ohprehshuhn Hahrm UhsuLT Wehpuhn Ohr Wehpuhnz

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:4: And|AeeThr Koz Eech Pruuvd UhsuLT Ohpressohr And Eech KuhnvikTed Mrdrur Tu Bee { Took Tu Then PuT In Then LokT In } JaeeL Fohr:

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:4:1: And|AeeThr A ShohrT Peereeuhd Fohr Wuhn uhsult krym
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:4:2: And|AeeThr A Mohr Long Peereuhd Fohr muLty-uhsuLt tohrchr Ohpreshuhn
RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:4:3: Ohr Fohr Thuh ResT Uhv Thuh LyfTym Fohr A deelihbureht mrdrur konvikt kuhnvikted Uhv less mrdrz Than ( DuhbuL Thuh GLohbuL Nuhmbr Uhv spureeuhss kuhnvikshuhnz uhv wuhn IhnuhsenT SuspekT uhv deeLihbureht mrdr ).

RTh SiTTizzen RyT 12:3:2:16:1:5: Ohr If Uh DeeLihburehT Mass-Mrdrur KonvikT Wuhz KuhnvikTed Uhv ( duhbul thuh GLohbuL nuhmbr uhv spureeuhss kuhnvikshuhnz uhv wuhn IhnuhsenT SuspekT uhv deeLihburehT mrdr ) then shood issuu uh deth wahrehnt tu koz that Wuhn PLuss duhbuL GLohbuL spureeuhss mass mrdrurz kovikt tu get put in a min kruuehl leethul eeLehktrik chehr that wehn trnd on duz koz min suhfreeng then leest suun deth.


Earth Constitution Article 13 - Directive Principles for the World Government

It shall be the aim of the World Government to secure certain other rights for all inhabitants within the Federation of Earth, but without immediate guarantee of universal achievement and enforcement. These rights are defined as Directive Principles, obligating the World Government to pursue every reasonable means for universal realization and implementation, and shall include the following:

Equal opportunity for useful employment for everyone, with wages or remuneration sufficient to assure human dignity.

Freedom of choice in work, occupation, employment or profession.

Full access to information and to the accumulated knowledge of the human race.

Free and adequate public education available to everyone, extending to the pre-university level; Equal opportunities for elementary and higher education for all persons; equal opportunity for continued education for all persons throughout life; the right of any person or parent to choose a private educational institution at any time.

Free and adequate public health services and medical care available to everyone throughout life under conditions of free choice.

Equal opportunity for leisure time for everyone; better distribution of the work load of society so that every person may have equitable leisure time opportunities.

Equal opportunity for everyone to enjoy the benefits of scientific and technological discoveries and developments.

Protection for everyone against the hazards and perils of technological innovations and developments.

Protection of the natural environment which is the common heritage of humanity against pollution, ecological disruption or damage which could imperil life or lower the quality of life.

Conservation of those natural resources of Earth which are limited so that present and future generations may continue to enjoy life on the planet Earth.

Assurance for everyone of adequate housing, of adequate and nutritious food supplies, of safe and adequate water supplies, of pure air with protection of oxygen supplies and the ozone layer, and in general for the continuance of an environment which can sustain healthy living for all.

Assure to each child the right to the full realization of his or her potential.

Social Security for everyone to relieve the hazards of unemployment, sickness, old age, family circumstances, disability, catastrophes of nature, and technological change, and to allow retirement with sufficient lifetime income for living under conditions of human dignity during older age.

Rapid elimination of and prohibitions against technological hazards and man-made environmental disturbances which are found to create dangers to life on Earth.

Implementation of intensive programs to discover, develop and institute safe alternatives and practical substitutions for technologies which must be eliminated and prohibited because of hazards and dangers to life.

Encouragement for cultural diversity; encouragement for decentralized administration.

Freedom for peaceful self-determination for minorities, refugees and dissenters.

Freedom for change of residence to anywhere on Earth conditioned by provisions for temporary sanctuaries in events of large numbers of refugees, stateless persons, or mass migrations.
Prohibition against the death penalty.