Theeree: ( Science = Proved TruTh )

Pronunciation Uv [ Law Meaning Of Word Science * IPA: /ˈsaɪəns/

[ /saɪəns/ In Yeeng Voiss Sownd Chahrz } Iz Syuhnss.

Science Law Def In Yeeng Voiss Sownd Chahrz

What is SCIENCE?:

Knowledge that is comprised of verifiable and measurable facts that have been acquired by the application of a scientific method.

Thus, { { Definishun Uv [ Wrd Syuhnss ] } In [ Simp Lang ] } Iz:

Scientific Method in Funetik Inglish iz Saiuntihfik Methud

SaiunTihfik Methud iz Saiuntihfik + Methuhd,

Pronunciation: IPA(key): /ˌsaɪənˈtɪfɪk/

IPA saɪənˈtɪfɪk In [[Yeeng Voiss Sownd Chahrz]]] Iz SaiuhnTihfihk.

Etymology Uv Wrd ScienTific
Borrowing from Middle French scientifique, from Medieval Latin scientificus (“pertaining to science”).

Methuhd Vrs (Haoh=#)1: ( MeThod In Yeeng Voiss Sownd Chahrz

Methuhd Vrs (Haoh=#)2: method (n.)

early 15c., "regular, systematic treatment of disease," from Latin methodus "way of teaching or going," from Greek methodos "scientific inquiry, method of inquiry, investigation," originally "pursuit, a following after," from meta "in pursuit or quest of" (see meta-) + hodos "a method, system; a way or manner" (of doing, saying, etc.), also "a traveling, journey," literally "a path, track, road," a word of uncertain origin… Meaning "way of doing anything" is from 1580s; that of "orderliness, regularity" is from 1610s. In reference to a theory of acting associated with Russian director Konstantin Stanislavsky, it is attested from 1923.

Methuhd Vrs (Haoh=#)3: Methud In Simp Lang

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Etymology Uv ( ( Wrd science ) (n.) )

mid-14c., "what is known, knowledge (of something) acquired by study; information;" also "assurance of knowledge, certitude, certainty," from Old French science "knowledge, learning, application; corpus of human knowledge" (12c.), from Latin scientia "knowledge, a knowing; expertness," from sciens (genitive scientis) "intelligent, skilled," present participle of scire "to know," probably originally "to separate one thing from another, to distinguish," related to scindere "to cut, divide," from PIE root *skei- "to cut, split" (source also of Greek skhizein "to split, rend, cleave," Gothic skaidan, Old English sceadan "to divide, separate").

From late 14c. in English as "book-learning," also "a particular branch of knowledge or of learning;" also "skillfulness, cleverness; craftiness." From c. 1400 as "experiential knowledge;" also "a skill, handicraft; a trade." From late 14c. as "collective human knowledge" (especially that gained by systematic observation, experiment, and reasoning). Modern (restricted) sense of "body of regular or methodical observations or propositions concerning a particular subject or speculation" is attested from 1725; in 17c.-18c. this concept commonly was called philosophy. Sense of "non-arts studies" is attested from 1670s.

Science, since people must do it, is a socially embedded activity. It progresses by hunch, vision, and intuition. Much of its change through time does not record a closer approach to absolute truth, but the alteration of cultural contexts that influence it so strongly. Facts are not pure and unsullied bits of information; culture also influences what we see and how we see it. Theories, moreover, are not inexorable inductions from facts. The most creative theories are often imaginative visions imposed upon facts; the source of imagination is also strongly cultural. [Stephen Jay Gould, introduction to "The Mismeasure of Man," 1981]

In science you must not talk before you know. In art you must not talk before you do. In literature you must not talk before you think. [John Ruskin, "The Eagle's Nest," 1872]

The distinction is commonly understood as between theoretical truth (Greek episteme) and methods for effecting practical results (tekhne), but science sometimes is used for practical applications and art for applications of skill.

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TruTh In Yeeng Voyss Sownd Chahrz Iz TrwTh Uv SpihriT Uv Trwth.

ETymoLogy Uv Wrd: truth (n.)

Old English triewð (West Saxon), treowð (Mercian) "faith, faithfulness, fidelity, loyalty; veracity, quality of being true; pledge, covenant," from Germanic abstract noun *treuwitho, from Proto-Germanic treuwaz "having or characterized by good faith," from PIE *drew-o-, a suffixed form of the root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast." With Germanic abstract noun suffix *-itho (see -th (2)).

Sense of "something that is true" is first recorded mid-14c. Meaning "accuracy, correctness" is from 1560s. English and most other IE languages do not have a primary verb for for "speak the truth," as a contrast to lie (v.). Truth squad in U.S. political sense first attested in the 1952 U.S. presidential election campaign.

See ALso=AhLsoh:

See Also=AhLsoh: