NooTrishuhn Fohr Herroin Eewzrz Uhv Heroin NuTriTion And Avoiding Overdose DeTh

In 2011, Alves et al. assessed nutritional and socio demographic characteristics of heroin addicts during detoxification program, and it was found that heroin addicts consume less than the minimum amount of vegetable, fruit and grains recommended by the food pyramid and are more eager to have sweets. Several other studies have also demonstrated that the consumption of vegetables and fruit in drug addicts are less than general population and they are more prone to consume food with low vitamin content… Increasing the dietary intake of protein and reducing simple carbohydrates in the form of vegetables and whole grains can manage the carbohydrate-metabolism health problems. Therefore, to recover from opiates addiction, patients need to consume even more amino acids and protein during the treatment process. Methadone maintenance treatment, itself, is not a favorable approach until is coupled with proper diet due to negative role of vitamins and minerals deficiencies in withdrawal process. Despite proteins and key vitamins, as well as minerals such as zinc, iron, calcium, chromium, magnesium, potassium and other essential nutrients should be prescribed in detoxification programs to recovering addicts. Zinc can help to improve immune system and proper brain function (82). Many opiate and alcohol addicts have shown calcium and magnesium deficiencies due to poor diet and inadequate intake of calcium. Calcium and magnesium deficiencies are the major factors of pain and nervous/muscular disorders among addicts and alcohol consumers during detoxification programs.
- Frum: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4411899/

Opioid Withdrawal Naturopathic Treatments

Opioid WiThdrawal Nutrition Treatments

In one study, 30 opioid addicts withdrawing from heroin or methadone were treated with high-dose vitamin C along with supplemental protein and a daily high-potency multivitamin-multimineral supplement (providing 500 mg per day of magnesium). The dosage of vitamin C during the first 12-24 hours was usually slightly larger than the bowel-tolerance level, and ranged from 25 to 85 g per day (in divided doses, as sodium ascorbate). After the first 12-24 hours, the dosage was reduced to some extent according to the clinical response, although it was not clear from the report how much it was reduced. After a total of 4-6 days, the dosage was reduced further to a maintenance level of 10-30 g per day. If withdrawal symptoms occurred during the first 4-6 days, the dosage of vitamin C was increased. The patients also received 9 tablespoons per day of predigested liquid protein until they were eating well. With this regimen, withdrawal symptoms typically did not occur, and the patients experienced a rapid and striking improvement in well-being…Nearly half of the patients receiving the nutritional regimen reported having used heroin, methadone, or some other drug while continuing the vitamin C-based therapy. Of those, 60% stated that the nutritional treatment blocked the effect of the drug.


Opioids And Cannabis

Thuh NexT TexT Wuhz Fruhm:

Opioids & cannabis: Gaining an upper hand on pain

Submitted by Marijuana News on Wed, 05/08/2019 - 10:56

When it comes to cannabis and opioids, there are important (and beneficial) chemical interactions between the two substances — but the real story is in how cannabis can push back against the opioid crisis…

A full accounting of what is happening here is well beyond the scope of this post (this New Yorker article on the role of prescription drug companies in pushing opioid prescriptions is a good place to start), but it all comes back to one word: pain…

Pain is notoriously hard to track, especially at a population scale, and this is reflected in the range of estimates of how many people cope with it. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Protection, 11-40% of Americans experience chronic pain. That’s a huge range, but even at the low end, that means 35 million Americans have this issue, with the higher estimates over 100 million. Any way you slice it, that’s an enormous market.

Furthermore, opioids only treat the symptom — pain itself — not its underlying cause, meaning patients often need daily treatment. Opioids can be horrifically addictive, and often make one numb to everything, not just pain. And they can be fatal when over-consumed.

Enter cannabis.

While many people remove or avoid opioids entirely because they use cannabis to treat their pain, others may simply use both, with fewer opioids entering their system as a result. Research has found a 27% decrease in pain when cannabis was included alongside opioids — and importantly, it also found that cannabis did not cause an increase in opioid levels in the bloodstream.

Furthermore, the two may be used in concert at doses that, though too small to do much individually, cause a significant reduction in pain when combined.

A Substitute, If Not a Solution

The plant has been the direct cause of exactly zero reported deaths and has nowhere near the addictive properties of opioids. It also has similar palliative effects when it comes to pain, and we now have good evidence that states with legal and available cannabis (medical or recreational) show lower rates of opioid abuse. One study found a 64% decrease in opioid use among medical cannabis patients, alongside a 45% increase in quality of life.

We see these personal stories represented en masse in the statistics: One study found a 24.8% reduction in opioid mortality rates in states that have legalized medical cannabis. It is not an exaggeration to say that legalizing cannabis across the entire U.S. could potentially save tens of millions of lives.

So much of the public discourse on cannabis is on mitigating its alleged harms and deciding where and how it can be used. When it comes to opioids, it appears thus far that available cannabis is a tremendous win for public health — and though certain experts contest its efficacy for “solving” the opioid crisis, it could potentially hold treatment options for those struggling with addiction.

But for the chronic pain experienced by tens, maybe hundreds of millions of Americans, cannabis may be the best medicine.


Thuh NexT TexT Wuhz Fruhm:

By Christopher G. Fichtner, MD, And Howard B. Moss, MD

Cannabis and opioids

The National Academy report did not find evidence to support or refute the conclusion that cannabis or cannabinoids are effective in achieving abstinence from addictive substances. However, one study of molecular THC to decrease opioid withdrawal during acute detoxification and increase treatment retention with naltrexone found that patients who elected to continue smoking marijuana were more likely to complete treatment.16

On the issue of whether cannabis access might impact opioid use and related problems, other recent studies have found decreased mortality17 due to opioid narcotic overdoses and reductions in hospitalizations18 related to opioid dependence and opioid overdose in states that have passed medical cannabis laws. Another recently published analysis of data on 44,000 illicit opioid users who completed the National Survey on Drug Use and Health from 2007 to 2013 found that __**marijuana use was associated with a 55% reduced risk of past year

Thiss Iz Thuh Last Lyn Uhv Tekst In Thuh Paeej Naeemd __**Opioid Withdrawal Naturopathic Treatments

Opioid Withdrawal Naturopathic Treatments

opioid WiThdrawal Nutrition treatments]

In one study, 30 opioid addicts withdrawing from heroin or methadone were treated with high-dose vitamin C along with supplemental protein and a daily high-potency multivitamin-multimineral supplement (providing 500 mg per day of magnesium). The dosage of vitamin C during the first 12-24 hours was usually slightly larger than the bowel-tolerance level, and ranged from 25 to 85 g per day (in divided doses, as sodium ascorbate). After the first 12-24 hours, the dosage was reduced to some extent according to the clinical response, although it was not clear from the report how much it was reduced. After a total of 4-6 days, the dosage was reduced further to a maintenance level of 10-30 g per day. If withdrawal symptoms occurred during the first 4-6 days, the dosage of vitamin C was increased. The patients also received 9 tablespoons per day of predigested liquid protein until they were eating well. With this regimen, withdrawal symptoms typically did not occur, and the patients experienced a rapid and striking improvement in well-being…Nearly half of the patients receiving the nutritional regimen reported having used heroin, methadone, or some other drug while continuing the vitamin C-based therapy. Of those, 60% stated that the nutritional treatment blocked the effect of the drug.