Simp Lang Mind in Funetik Inglish iz Mynd uv Omneeonizm.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: mīnd, IPA(key): /maɪnd/

Etymology uv mind

mind (n.)

late 12c., from Old English gemynd "memory, remembrance, state of being remembered; thought, purpose; conscious mind, intellect, intention," Proto-Germanic *ga-mundiz (source also of Gothic muns "thought," munan "to think;" Old Norse minni "mind;" German Minne (archaic) "love," originally "memory, loving memory"), from suffixed form of PIE root *men- (1) "to think," with derivatives referring to qualities of mind or states of thought.

Meaning "mental faculty" is mid-14c. "Memory," one of the oldest senses, now is almost obsolete except in old expressions such as bear in mind, call to mind. Mind's eye "remembrance" is early 15c. Phrase time out of mind is attested from early 15c. To pay no mind "disregard" is recorded from 1916, American English dialect. To have half a mind to "to have one's mind half made up to (do something)" is recorded from 1726. Mind-reading is from 1882.

mind (v.)

mid-14c., "to remember, take care to remember," also "to remind oneself," from mind (n.). Meaning "perceive, notice" is from late 15c.; that of "to give heed to" is from 1550s; that of "be careful about" is from 1737. Sense of "object to, dislike" is from c. 1600; negative use (with not) "to care for, to trouble oneself with" is attested from c. 1600. Meaning "to take care of, look after" is from 1690s. Related: Minded; minding. Meiotic expression don't mind if I do attested from 1847.

Medical definition uv mind [mīnd]
1. the organ or seat of consciousness; the faculty by which one is aware of surroundings and by which one is able to experience emotions, remember, reason, and make decisions.
2. the organized totality of an organism's mental and psychological processes, conscious and unconscious.
3. the characteristic thought process of a person or group.