ALL Sponge State In Simp Lang Iz AhL Spundj STeiT.

(OmniSponge=ALL Sponge

OmneeSpundj iz Omnee Plus Spundj.

AhL Mynd Plus OmneeFohm Iz ( OmneeSpunj = AhL Spundj ).

KwahnTuhm Fohm Iz FuhnehTik EengLish iz Quantum Foam

KwahnTuhm Fohm Iz KwahnTuhm Plus Fohm.

"There is no such thing as empty space;
there is only ‘quantum foam,’ everywhere."
-https://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2015/31dec_quantumfoam

"Quantum foam (or space time foam) is a concept in quantum mechanics. It was created by John Wheeler in 1955. The foam is supposed to be thought of as the foundation of the things that make up the universe."
-https://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_foam

See also:

[OmneeSpundj In Simp Lang Iz AhL Spundj.

See: Wy PrakTiss UhgehnsT SmahL T

STaeeT Iz FohnehTik EengLish Fohr STaTe

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /steɪt/

Etymology Uv Wrd STaTe

state (n.1):

c. 1200, "circumstances, position in society, temporary attributes of a person or thing, conditions," from Old French estat "position, condition; status, stature, station," and directly from Latin status "a station, position, place; way of standing, posture; order, arrangement, condition," figuratively "standing, rank; public order, community organization," noun of action from past participle stem of stare "to stand" from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Some Middle English senses are via Old French estat (French état; see estate).

The Latin word was adopted into other modern Germanic Languages (German, Dutch staat) but chiefly in the political senses only. Meaning "physical condition as regards form or structure" is attested from late 13c. Meaning "mental or emotional condition" is attested from 1530s (phrase state of mind first attested 1749); colloquial sense of "agitated or perturbed state" is from 1837.

state (n.2)

"political organization of a country, supreme civil power, government," c. 1300, from special use of state (n.1); this sense grew out of the meaning "condition of a country" with regard to government, prosperity, etc. (late 13c.), from Latin phrases such as status rei publicæ "condition (or existence) of the republic."

The sense of "a semi-independent political entity under a federal authority, one of the bodies politic which together make up a federal republic" is from 1774. The British North American colonies occasionally were called states as far back as 1630s; the States has been short for "the United States of America" since 1777; also of the Netherlands…

state (v.)

1590s, "to set in a position," from state (n.1); the sense of "declare in words" is first attested 1640s, from the notion of "placing" something on the record. Related: Stated; stating.


State Definition:

Groups of people which have acquired international recognition as an independent country and which have a population, a common language and a defined and distinct territory.

Related Terms: Government, International Law, Law of Nations, Nation, Citizenship…

A term of international law; an independent country with standing in international law such as by membership in the United Nations, recognition by other states and adherence to international treaties.


Legal Definition of State

As a noun, a people permanently occupying a fixed territory bound together by common habits and custom into one body politic exercising, through the medium of an organized government, independent sovereignty and control over all persons and things within its boundaries, capable of making war and peace and of entering into international relations with other states… The people of a state, in their collective capacity, considered as the party wronged by a criminal deed…

The circumstances or condition of a being or thing at a given time.

As a verb, to express the particulars of a thing in writing or in words; to set down or set forth in detail; to aver, allege, or declare. To set down in gross; to mention in general terms, or by way of reference; to refer.


See also:

Simp Lang Li In FohnehTik EengGLish Voeess Sownd Chahrz


Thuh Spohk Sowndz Fohr Thuh Zhong Lang Wrd SpeLd In Pin Yin Az "Li" AT

Thuh NexT TekST Wuhz AhLsoh Fruhm:

lĭ … English translations

reason, to manage, to put in order,
logic, to administer

Thuh NexT TekST Wuhz Fruhm:

理 lǐ

texture
grain (of wood)
inner essence
intrinsic order
reason
logic
truth
science
natural science (esp. physics)
to manage
to pay attention to
to run (affairs)
to handle
to put in order
to tidy up


Thuh NexT TekST Wuhz Fruhm:

Wing-tsit Chan explains that Li_(NeoConfucianism) …has come to mean ceremony, ritual, decorum, rules of propriety, good form, good custom, etc., and has even been equated with Natural Law."


Eech SyenTiffik Mynd MyT Sum Tymz Chooz Tu AkT Az An ObLiGaToRee ( { Wrd SpeLd "Li" Spohk Az Lee } Deskrybd Az STuhdeeyeeng Thuh Syehnss Baeesiks Kynd Typs KLasT By Syz Ohrdr Wich ReezuhnuhbLee LojjikkuLLee InkLuudz ( Syenss And NachuhruL Syenss And Fizziks) And NachuhruL Lah And Thuh KuhmpLeeT LisT Uhv Baeesik Kynd Typs KLasT By Syz Ohrdr ).


Thuh Trm Speld " Nachuhrul Lah " Wuhz Fixt Tu Nachurrul Lah.


Nachurrul Lah


Baeest Fruhm Heereeng https://www.howtopronounce.com/natural/,

  • Thuh Wrd Nohrm Speld " Natural "
  • Iz Spohk Az Thuh Speech Sownd Syn Seekwenss N->ă->ch->ü->r->ü->L

Nachurrul


Naeechr Iz Fohnehtik Eeng-glish Speech Sownd Synz
Fohr Nature

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Pronunciation

(Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈneɪtʃə/
(General American) IPA(key): /ˈneɪtʃɚ/
(Northern England) IPA(key): /ˈnɛːtʃɐ/

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

OhfishuL ETymoLogy nature (n.)

late 13c., "restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;" from Old French nature "nature, being, principle of life; character, essence," from Latin natura "course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe," literally "birth," from natus "born," past participle of nasci "to be born," from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget."

From late 14c. as "creation, the universe;" also "heredity, birth, hereditary circumstance; essential qualities, innate disposition" (as in human nature); "nature personified, Mother Nature." Specifically as "material world beyond human civilization or society" from 1660s. Nature and nurture have been contrasted since 1874.

Nature should be avoided in such vague expressions as 'a lover of nature,' 'poems about nature.' Unless more specific statements follow, the reader cannot tell whether the poems have to do with natural scenery, rural life, the sunset, the untouched wilderness, or the habits of squirrels. [Strunk & White, "The Elements of Style," 3rd ed., 1979]

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Encyclopedia Definition uv Nature

all natural phenomena and plant and animal life, as distinct from man and his creations

Biology: the complement of genetic material that partly determines the structure of an organism; genotype

Thus, Naichr Meenz "Bohrn Essenss".


Thuh Trm Speld " Suffix UhL " Wuhz Fixt Tu Suhfix UhL.


Suffix aL in Yeeng Voiss Sownd Chahrz

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Pronunciation

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Suffix -al

Of or pertaining to. Adjectival suffix appended to various words, often nouns, to make an adjective form. Often added to words of Latin origin, but used with other words also.

Forming nouns, especially of verbal action.


Simp Lang Lah


Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Law [ Wrd Deskripshuhn ]:

Rules of conduct approved and enforced by the government of and over a certain territory…

Related Terms: Regulation, Statutes, Lex Scripta, Act, Custom,… Civil Law,… Justice, Rule of Law, Substantive Law, Positive Law


Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

The Law

The role of government is to protect individual rights. It must ensure that nobody violates the rights of another. In this capacity, it must specify what kinds of actions are forbidden. These rules, punishable by retaliatory force, are called laws. Laws are predefined rules. They are written to make them explicit and verify that they are predefined.

Laws serve multiple purposes. The first is a method of informing the populace of what actions will bring about retaliatory force. This facilitates the job of protecting rights by enabling citizens to have knowledge beforehand whether a particular act is forbidden. The people are then able to act appropriately, removing the need for retaliatory force, and increasing the ability of people to avoid violating others rights.

The second job of a law is to make the rules of the land explicit. This serves to avoid confusion in exactly what is legal or not. Such confusion can occur since the government is an organization of individuals. Individuals that can err or have differences of opinions. It also limits the power of the government officials by requiring them to act according to predefined methods. This has the advantage of safeguarding the people from their own representatives.

A third job of the law is to clarify ambiguous situations between men that may be difficult to decide if rights have been violated, or by who. Even among rational men, disagreement can occur, especially in areas as complicated as contracts. The law provides them a means of settling disputes peacefully by subjecting their claims to an objective, predefined reference. In this respect, the law stands as an impartial arbiter to conflicts.

Laws have many other positive benefits as well, such as providing a reaffirmation that coercive acts will be punished, and justice will be served. To be secure in life and property, man must be able to know what to expect from other people. Although an occasional criminal may act against the rules that govern society, this is exceptional. One interacts in a society because the majority of men act in good faith to respect each other's rights. The law is the primary facilitator for this.


See Also=AhLsoh:


Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Natural Law

Natural law is the philosophy that certain rights, moral values, and responsibilities are inherent in human nature, and that those rights can be understood through simple reasoning. In other words, they just make sense when you consider the nature of humanity. Throughout history, the phrase “natural law” has had to do with determining how humans should behave morally. The law of nature is universal, meaning that it applies to everyone in the same way. To explore this concept, consider the following natural law definition.

Definition of Natural Law

Noun

The belief that certain laws of morality are inherent by human nature, reason, or religious belief, and that they are ethically binding on humanity.


Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Natural law [ is a ] theory that some laws are basic and fundamental to human nature and are discoverable by human reason without reference to specific legislative enactments or judicial decisions.

Natural law is opposed to positive law, which is determined by humans, conditioned by history, and subject to continuous change.

The concept of natural law originated with the Greeks and received its most important formulation in Stoicism. The Stoics believed that the fundamental moral principles that underlie all the legal systems of different nations were reducible to the dictates of natural law.

This idea became particularly important in Roman legal theory, which eventually came to recognize a common code regulating the conduct of all peoples and existing alongside the individual codes of specific places and times (see natural rights)…

In modern times, the theory of natural law became the chief basis for the development by Hugo Grotius of the theory of international law.

In the 17th cent., such philosophers as Spinoza and G. W. von Leibniz interpreted natural law as the basis of ethics and morality.

In the 18th cent. the teachings of Jean Jacques Rousseau, especially as interpreted during the French Revolution, made natural law a basis for democratic and egalitarian principles.

The influence of natural law theory declined greatly in the 19th cent. under the impact of positivism, empiricism, and materialism.

In the 20th cent., such thinkers as Jacques Maritain saw in natural law a necessary intellectual opposition to totalitarian theories.


See ALso=AhLsoh:




Nachurrul Lah


Baeest Fruhm Heereeng https://www.howtopronounce.com/natural/,

  • Thuh Wrd Nohrm Speld " Natural "
  • Iz Spohk Az Thuh Speech Sownd Syn Seekwenss N->ă->ch->ü->r->ü->L

Nachurrul


Naeechr Iz Fohnehtik Eeng-glish Speech Sownd Synz
Fohr Nature

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Pronunciation

(Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈneɪtʃə/
(General American) IPA(key): /ˈneɪtʃɚ/
(Northern England) IPA(key): /ˈnɛːtʃɐ/

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

OhfishuL ETymoLogy nature (n.)

late 13c., "restorative powers of the body, bodily processes; powers of growth;" from Old French nature "nature, being, principle of life; character, essence," from Latin natura "course of things; natural character, constitution, quality; the universe," literally "birth," from natus "born," past participle of nasci "to be born," from PIE root *gene- "give birth, beget."

From late 14c. as "creation, the universe;" also "heredity, birth, hereditary circumstance; essential qualities, innate disposition" (as in human nature); "nature personified, Mother Nature." Specifically as "material world beyond human civilization or society" from 1660s. Nature and nurture have been contrasted since 1874.

Nature should be avoided in such vague expressions as 'a lover of nature,' 'poems about nature.' Unless more specific statements follow, the reader cannot tell whether the poems have to do with natural scenery, rural life, the sunset, the untouched wilderness, or the habits of squirrels. [Strunk & White, "The Elements of Style," 3rd ed., 1979]

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Encyclopedia Definition uv Nature

all natural phenomena and plant and animal life, as distinct from man and his creations

Biology: the complement of genetic material that partly determines the structure of an organism; genotype

Thus, Naichr Meenz "Bohrn Essenss".


Thuh Trm Speld " Suffix UhL " Wuhz Fixt Tu Suhfix UhL.


Suffix aL in Yeeng Voiss Sownd Chahrz

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Pronunciation

Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Suffix -al

Of or pertaining to. Adjectival suffix appended to various words, often nouns, to make an adjective form. Often added to words of Latin origin, but used with other words also.

Forming nouns, especially of verbal action.


Simp Lang Lah


Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Law [ Wrd Deskripshuhn ]:

Rules of conduct approved and enforced by the government of and over a certain territory…

Related Terms: Regulation, Statutes, Lex Scripta, Act, Custom,… Civil Law,… Justice, Rule of Law, Substantive Law, Positive Law


Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

The Law

The role of government is to protect individual rights. It must ensure that nobody violates the rights of another. In this capacity, it must specify what kinds of actions are forbidden. These rules, punishable by retaliatory force, are called laws. Laws are predefined rules. They are written to make them explicit and verify that they are predefined.

Laws serve multiple purposes. The first is a method of informing the populace of what actions will bring about retaliatory force. This facilitates the job of protecting rights by enabling citizens to have knowledge beforehand whether a particular act is forbidden. The people are then able to act appropriately, removing the need for retaliatory force, and increasing the ability of people to avoid violating others rights.

The second job of a law is to make the rules of the land explicit. This serves to avoid confusion in exactly what is legal or not. Such confusion can occur since the government is an organization of individuals. Individuals that can err or have differences of opinions. It also limits the power of the government officials by requiring them to act according to predefined methods. This has the advantage of safeguarding the people from their own representatives.

A third job of the law is to clarify ambiguous situations between men that may be difficult to decide if rights have been violated, or by who. Even among rational men, disagreement can occur, especially in areas as complicated as contracts. The law provides them a means of settling disputes peacefully by subjecting their claims to an objective, predefined reference. In this respect, the law stands as an impartial arbiter to conflicts.

Laws have many other positive benefits as well, such as providing a reaffirmation that coercive acts will be punished, and justice will be served. To be secure in life and property, man must be able to know what to expect from other people. Although an occasional criminal may act against the rules that govern society, this is exceptional. One interacts in a society because the majority of men act in good faith to respect each other's rights. The law is the primary facilitator for this.


See Also=AhLsoh:


Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Natural Law

Natural law is the philosophy that certain rights, moral values, and responsibilities are inherent in human nature, and that those rights can be understood through simple reasoning. In other words, they just make sense when you consider the nature of humanity. Throughout history, the phrase “natural law” has had to do with determining how humans should behave morally. The law of nature is universal, meaning that it applies to everyone in the same way. To explore this concept, consider the following natural law definition.

Definition of Natural Law

Noun

The belief that certain laws of morality are inherent by human nature, reason, or religious belief, and that they are ethically binding on humanity.


Thuh Nekst Tekst Wuhz Fruhm:

Natural law [ is a ] theory that some laws are basic and fundamental to human nature and are discoverable by human reason without reference to specific legislative enactments or judicial decisions.

Natural law is opposed to positive law, which is determined by humans, conditioned by history, and subject to continuous change.

The concept of natural law originated with the Greeks and received its most important formulation in Stoicism. The Stoics believed that the fundamental moral principles that underlie all the legal systems of different nations were reducible to the dictates of natural law.

This idea became particularly important in Roman legal theory, which eventually came to recognize a common code regulating the conduct of all peoples and existing alongside the individual codes of specific places and times (see natural rights)…

In modern times, the theory of natural law became the chief basis for the development by Hugo Grotius of the theory of international law.

In the 17th cent., such philosophers as Spinoza and G. W. von Leibniz interpreted natural law as the basis of ethics and morality.

In the 18th cent. the teachings of Jean Jacques Rousseau, especially as interpreted during the French Revolution, made natural law a basis for democratic and egalitarian principles.

The influence of natural law theory declined greatly in the 19th cent. under the impact of positivism, empiricism, and materialism.

In the 20th cent., such thinkers as Jacques Maritain saw in natural law a necessary intellectual opposition to totalitarian theories.


See ALso=AhLsoh: